What Happens To Your Bone As You Age?

Rheumatology Diseases
Rheumatology Diseases
Joint Pain
Joint Pain

Bone strength and density are linked to a host of genetical and lifestyle habits. Apart from this, medical conditions also affect the way bones grow and age. Bone strength and density increase as we age, up to the age of 35. After reaching this ‘peak’, it holds out steadily for most of your mid-adulthood. After this point, say the late 40s, your bone density declines at a steady 1-2% every year. For women, the effect is more amplified; around menopause, the bone loss can accelerate to 5% per year for around 4-5 years perimenopausal.

In the body, the bone and the skeletal system are in the constant state of renewal. Old bones breakdown and make way for the new bone matter. This rate of regeneration takes a hit the minute we go past the age of 35. This is the reason why younger people are able to recover much more easily from injuries to the bone when compared to an elder.

To help clear the air, this process of bone loss is inevitable. It will happen unless medical science and innovation have made a form of fountain of youth to help reverse aging. This means that the higher the peak bone density is, the more you can lose without severely affecting mobility. The higher the maximum bone density you achieve when you are younger, the less is the likeliness that you will have to come face to face with osteoporosis and forms of joint pain. 

Think of your body as a ‘bone bank’- You cash in on the savings after you hit mid-30s.

How high the peak goes all depends on your genetics, the dietary lifestyle, and any medical conditions that you may have or are presently encountering. If your family has not had the problem of osteoporosis, then chances are that you will be in the clear as well. But even still, having a well-balanced diet and loads of Calcium is paramount to allowing healthy bone growth and regrowth. The lower your calcium intake, the diminished your bone growth will be and higher will be the risk of developing fractures. Lack of vitamin D and Vitamin C prevents the production of certain collagens that causes softening and weakening of the bone tissue.

Hormone levels, race and family history, gender, size, tobacco and alcohol use, all go to determine this ‘peak’ bone density.

Make sure to incorporate certain lifestyle changes right now, so that you will not have to face the brunt down the line.